Wigwam Comfort Hiker Socks

I spend a lot of time on the trail. Little known fact, I’m a bit of a tenderfoot. That causes problems for me, and finding a sock to suck up the impacts of miles of abuse is difficult. The Comfort Hikers get the job done where nothing else has.

A blend of 67% Merino Wool, 21% stretch Nylon, 7% Elastic and 5% acrylic comes together to form a generously padded quick drying sock that provides higher than average protection from abrasion, blisters and impact.  The natural blend resists odors and stretching, returns to it’s shape after miles of abuse, and is itch free. They retail for $15 and are available in a variety of colors and sizes.

Wigwam Comfort Hiker socks

What I like

I’ve tried many, many socks. Most of them fall flat in the areas that are really important to me, padding from impact and blister resistance. The Comfort Hikers excel in this area. Thicker than average cushioning against the soles provided more comfort after more miles than anything else I’ve tried, while the quick drying materials stay dry even on hot days, preventing blisters from the added friction. The elasticized arch helps keep the sock in place, and the seamless toe closure is almost indiscernible from the rest of the sock. The soft materials feel great against the skin, free of itching of scruffiness that some Merino socks can have.

The socks are warm but still ventilate and cool off pretty well, providing usability 12 months out of the year. I’ve used them in snow, in dessert, and in the humid mountains of Tennessee. They perform well everywhere. While at camp I’m happy to kick off my boots while in my tent, even in the winter, without having to worry too much about my feet getting cold.

Durability is fantastic. I’ve been using the same pair of socks for over 3 years, and they’re still going strong. I’ve since been adding more and more pairs of these in different colors, swapping them out day-to-day on the trail. Other than a little bit of light frizzing on my oldest pair, the socks are flawless. Still padded, thick, and free of stretched seams or loss of shape.

They’re some of the better priced socks on the market. 15 dollars for real, luscious protection verses the thin fragile socks many other companies are pushing makes them an exceptional value.

Wigwam Comfort Hiker socks

What I didn’t like

Some will be turned off by the warmth of the socks in the summer. They can get warm, and they may make the foot sweat a bit, but I’ve found it to be less of an issue with these than thinner socks, as the added thickness distributes the moisture better and thus dries quicker.

Overall

The Merino Comfort Hiker Sock from Wigwam is a sorely overlooked sock on the market. They have never let me down, even fighting blister on poor fitting boots during fast, aggressive 30 mile backpacking trips. I’ve used them in deserts of California, the peaks of Colorado, the muggy valleys of Tennesee, the rocky ridges of Virginia, and the sandy beaches of Georgia. Blister free, pain-free, and always dependable. They’re an exceptional value and perfect for anyone who needs more cushion, or just wants one sock they can use year round in any condition.

The highest of recommendations

For more information on Wigwam Comfort Hiker Socks check here, Wigwam Comfort Hiker Socks

for information on our rating system and our testing procedures, check out our About us/ Contact us page.

I want to extend a big thanks to Wigwam for keeping my feet happy and providing us these great socks for review. Our full disclosure can be found here.

Thanks for reading! If you have any questions, comment below, send us an email, or find us on Twitter or Facebook (links on the right and below).

 

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