An Ultralight Tomahawk? Let’s talk about it.

Aimed at survival enthusiast and collectors, the ‘Hawk’ is an 17 ounce steel tomahawk by Jason Hanson, designed as an emergency tool with maximum impact for minimal weight. My review:

The “Hawk” as it is referred to on their website is a simple yet sturdy single piece of steel wrapped in paracord. There is a wide chopping axe on one end of the head, with a pointed pick on the other. It includes a nylon sheath with a couple clips to help keep it secure, which is vital for safe carry and packing.

After using the tomahawk I’ve found that it is rather light-weight for a tomahawk, and fits well enough in the hand. The paracord wrap is all the comfort and grip that is provided, and the steel underneath is flat and rigid. So, it’s not extremely comfortable to use for extended periods of time and the grip itself could be a little better (re-wrapping the handle with a “samurai cord wrap” really helps improve the feel and the grip), but it is serviceable in an emergency situation, which is the point. The blade is sharp enough to chop without breaking down too quickly, and the pick is extremely sharp and rigid, making it great for breaking glass or ice. I also quite enjoyed the balance of the tool. While it is clearly top heavy, the lightweight nature means the head isn’t providing a lot of heft, which can make these kinds. Durability seems rather good, with only minimal damage to the paint and metal after use.

I did have some qualms with the sheath. Getting the axe in and out proved to be an occasional pain as the blade itself gets hung up on the rivets at times, but crucially only takes a few seconds to remove. I also found that only carrying the axe over a few miles while strapped securely to my pack, the pick end actually punctured the case, later finding its way to my hand while digging through my pack, which was painfully disappointing. If they added a nylon sheet on the inside of the case this would be a big improvement as it would stiffen the shell, improve the ingress of the blade, while also helping to prevent punctures like this from happening. Replacing some of the permanent grommets along the bottom edge with removable clips would also be an improvement here, as it would greatly improve ease of access. I also noted that additional grommets along the top of the case and blade would help prevent the axe from moving around inside, further reducing the chances of it puncturing through. So there are improvements to be made here, but this is really only an issue if it’s being carried.

This Tactical Tomahawk was mailed to me for review, and when researching the company I found some weirdness. The site they provided, “freetomahawk.com”, redirects to “https://cf.spybriefing.com/squeeze-page-502415481629184658477“, which is the actual website with questionable syntax. The site has some typos, refers to the axe as “free” but also mentions a return and money back policy. An actual price is nowhere to be found, so there are items of concern here. You also have to put your contact info into a form to receive the purchase info, all of which seems a bit sketchy to me. But, their PR group seems adamant that they’re legit and they have appeared in a few magazines and articles that I could find. So, if you’ve ordered from them let me know. Would love to hear about it.

So, would I recommend the Ultra-light tomahawk? Well, as an emergency tool, depending on the price, it does make a lot of sense. Being able to cut your way out of a crashed car, locked building or something similar in a dramatic situation could be a life saver, literally. For backpacking and hiking? I can’t say anyone should seriously consider carrying one of these into the backcountry. It’s large, heavy, and the sheath doesn’t provide enough protection for it to safe and secure over long distances. However, leaving it in the car is a great option. But, I still like the product for what it is. It’s light, sturdy, and does exactly what it should without failing. Still, I do wish it was available on Amazon or another large retailer, and I have provided this feedback to the PR group. Perhaps in the future this will change. We’ll have to wait and see if it’s legit or not as I can’t personally vouch for them. But, the product seems of good quality even if not exceptional. But, as a survival product? Simple, functional and affordable is all it really needs to be, and it is exactly that.

Want to learn more about this product and their other offerings? You can check out their products Here. This is not an affiliate link and is at your own risk as I’ve never ordered from them.

For information on our rating system and our testing procedures, check out our About us/ Contact us page.

I want to extend a huge thanks for providing this product for review. We couldn’t do it without their help.

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